On this day in Alabama history: Sequoyah stamp in the Great American Series was issued

On this day in Alabama history: Sequoyah stamp in the Great American Series was issued
Portrait of Sequoyah holding the Cherokee alphabet, c. 1838. (Created by John T. Bowen, Published by F.W. Greenough, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

December 27, 1980

The U.S. Postal Service honored Cherokee leader Sequoyah by issuing a 19-cent stamp in his likeness as the premier stamp in its new Great American Series. The Tuskegee-born silversmith and veteran of the Creek War of 1813-14, Sequoyah is best known for inventing an 86-character syllabary of the Cherokee language that made it possible to read and write. In 1839, he served as president of the western Cherokee and reunited the group with the eastern Cherokee through an Act of Union following the latter groups removal to Indian Territory. Today, Sequoyah is memorialized in the U.S. Capitol’s Statuary Hall, representing Oklahoma, and through the giant sequoia redwood trees named in his honor.

Read more at Encyclopedia of Alabama.

For more on Alabama’s Bicentennial, visit Alabama 200.

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