On this day in Alabama history: Surgeon general delivers report on smoking

On this day in Alabama history: Surgeon general delivers report on smoking
Prior to his appointment by President John F. Kennedy as surgeon general in 1961, Luther Terry held leading positions at the Public Health Service Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, and at the Clinic of General Medicine and Experimental Therapeutics at the National Heart Institute (now the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute). (From Encyclopedia of Alabama, courtesy of University of Alabama at Birmingham Archives)

January 11, 1964

Surgeon General Luther Terry delivered the first Surgeon General‘s Report on Smoking and Health. Appointed to the position of surgeon general by President John F. Kennedy in 1961, Terry personally quit smoking in 1963 and undertook a campaign urging all American smokers to do the same. His report, based on more than 7,000 peer-reviewed articles, declared smoking to be a health hazard responsible for causing cardiovascular disease, emphysema, lung cancer and other ailments. The report was the first of more than 20 and resulted in the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act of 1965, requiring a warning label on each package of cigarettes.

Read more at Encyclopedia of Alabama.

For more on Alabama’s Bicentennial, visit Alabama 200.

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