On this day in Alabama history: Spanish force anchored in Mobile Bay

On this day in Alabama history: Spanish force anchored in Mobile Bay
Historic marker at Fort Condé, with downtown Mobile in the background, 2017. (Erin Kinney, Flickr)

February 10, 1780

A sizable Spanish force anchored in Mobile Bay in preparation for the Battle of Fort Charlotte, one of two American Revolution battles fought in present-day Alabama. Originally constructed by the French as Fort Condé in 1723, Fort Charlotte became a British possession in 1763 after their victory over France in the Seven Years’ War. On Feb. 25, 1780, more than 1,000 Spanish troops under the command of Don Bernardo de Gálvez, governor of Louisiana, landed on the shores of the Dog River. After British commander Elias Durnford refused to surrender, the Spanish besieged the fort for 14 days, taking control on March 14. The Spanish retained control of the fort, renamed Fuerta Carlota, until 1813.

Read more at Encyclopedia of Alabama.

For more on Alabama’s Bicentennial, visit Alabama 200.

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