On this day in Alabama history: Apollo 11 lands on moon with Alabama boost

On this day in Alabama history: Apollo 11 lands on moon with Alabama boost
The first full engine assembly static firing is seen at Marshall Space Flight Center's static test tower in Huntsville in May 1960. (From Encyclopedia of Alabama, Library of Congress)

July 20, 1969

In a voyage that began with rockets developed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, man landed on the moon. The Saturn V booster rockets, which lifted Apollo 11 out of Earth’s orbit, were developed throughout the 1960s by a team led by Wernher von Braun, the first director of Marshall. The landing by the Apollo 11 crew, Neil Armstrong, Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin Jr. and Michael Collins, fulfilled a national goal set by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 to perform a crewed lunar landing and return to Earth before the end of the decade. When Armstrong set foot on the moon’s surface, more than half a billion people witnessed it on television and heard his immortal words: “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Read more at Encyclopedia of Alabama of the Marshall Space Flight Center’s Technical Information Summary

For more on Alabama’s Bicentennial, visit Alabama 200.

 

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