Alabama animal shelters still on the job meeting pets’ needs in midst of COVID-19 pandemic

Alabama animal shelters still on the job meeting pets’ needs in midst of COVID-19 pandemic
During the COVID-19 crisis, the Greater Birmingham Humane Society has turned its Adoption, Outreach and Education Center on Snow Drive in Birmingham into the COVID-19 Regional Pet Pantry. GBHS is distributing 40,000 pounds of food supplied by GreaterGood to the pet community. (Greater Birmingham Humane Society)

This year, 7-year-old Diana Bailey received an early birthday surprise – a new furry friend to help fill her days at home during the nation’s coronavirus crisis.

“I told Diana that if she was good, she could have a dog for her birthday in August,” said Jeannine, the girl’s mom. “But when we were sequestered, I thought this would be a good time to get a dog because we would be at home and would have more time to housetrain it.”

After scouring the web, Jeannine, a talent and employment manager at Alabama Power’s Corporate Headquarters in Birmingham, and Diana found their “dream dog” at Crossing Paths Animal Rescue Center in Cleveland, Alabama.

Jeannine completed an application, and on March 25 she and her daughter headed to Crossing Paths Rescue to meet their new friend, a mixed-breed puppy named Lindsey.

“Having a dog has been great for Diana,” said Bailey. “She is an only child and is out of school. This has given her something fun to be excited about while she is at home. She has been super cute about taking the dog out to play, and we’ve been taking her on walks.”

Bailey encourages others to consider following in her family’s footsteps.

“I think all of us are trying to find ways to make the best of this situation,” said Bailey. “Getting a dog was a really great way to turn a negative into a positive. We’re stuck here, and now we’re stuck with a cute new puppy.”

Fido needs a home

Mary Ellen Tidwell, president and founder of Crossing Paths Rescue, said with so many dogs in need of a “forever” home, the door of this small center is remaining open during this difficult season.

“A lot of people want to feel like they are making a difference during this time,” she said. “Everybody is working at home, so what better time is there to foster or adopt a pet and have more time to socialize it? Why not step up?”

Crossing Paths Rescue, founded in 2007, is a group of volunteers who find loving homes for hundreds of dogs every year. The no-kill center rescues dogs in Blount and Jefferson counties that have been abandoned or have little hope of finding a home.

Crossing Paths has established a satellite facility in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to raise awareness in the Northeast about the great need of homes for Alabama dogs. Through this partnership, Crossing Paths Rescue has delivered dogs to families living as far away as Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Delaware, New York and even Canada.

Tidwell said the center’s staff is taking every precaution and practicing social distancing during this time. The adoption contract and fees can be completed online, and the dogs are microchipped in advance.

“When people arrive, their dog is ready to go,” she said. “We bring the dog to the car, or they can come in and get it and go. We do everything within 15 seconds.”

Tidwell said people who cannot adopt or foster a dog can meet another need – purchase pet supplies, pet food or litter, and donate it to a local shelter or rescue center.

“Even though we’re in the worst of times, we’re seeing the best of people,” Tidwell said. “These dogs don’t have a voice, but we can take up the gauntlet and fight for them and make a difference.”

Check out the available dogs or apply to foster or adopt one by visiting www.crossingpathsanimalrescue.org.

Speaking of pet food

Meanwhile, the Greater Birmingham Humane Society (GBHS), like some other major animal shelters in Alabama, has temporarily closed its doors to the public while the COVID-19 epidemic continues. The shelter has delivered its more than 200 pets to foster homes but now has another way to help dogs and cats.

On Thursday, April 2, GBHS turned its Adoption, Outreach and Education Center on Snow Drive in Birmingham into the COVID-19 Regional Pet Pantry. The drive-through pantry provides food to financially strapped pet owners as well as to rescue centers and shelters that need help to feed animals.

GBHS is feeding the hungry pet community with more than 40,000 pounds of food it received from the GreaterGood nonprofit.

“We’re very lucky that we have this bulk amount of food that we can distribute to animals in need,” said Lindsey Mays, GBHS director of marketing. “Many people have been furloughed or laid off, and we don’t want them to have to worry about feeding their pet. It is important that we help each other during this stressful time so we will be stronger when we come out on the other side.”

GBHS is looking for “community captains” to identify needs of neighboring pet owners who may be shut in or not have transportation to pick up food or supplies. Community captains will safely check on neighbors, report which pet supplies are needed to the GBHS COVID-19 Regional Pet Pantry and schedule a time for pickup.

“We are grateful to be able to serve pet owners, fosters, rescues and other shelters,” said Allison Black Cornelius, CEO of GBHS. “We know that many families are struggling financially right now, and it is our hope that the GBHS Regional Pet Pantry will alleviate a little of their stress and ensure that our community’s pets are not forgotten.”

To receive pet food for yourself, neighbor or rescue facility, and schedule a date to pick up the items, complete an application at gbhs.org/regionalpetpantry. Anyone who does not have internet access can drop by the facility Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Donations of pet food are welcome and can be delivered to the pantry Monday-Friday between 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.

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